Active Learning and the Savior's Nephite Ministry

Title

Active Learning and the Savior's Nephite Ministry

Publication Type

Journal Article

Year of Publication

2009

Authors

Sweat, Anthony (Primary)

Journal

Religious Educator

Pagination

75-86

Volume

10

Issue

3

Terms of use

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Bibliographic Citation

Sweat, Anthony. "Active Learning and the Savior's Nephite Ministry" In Religious Educator, Vol. 10. 2009:75-86.

Abstract

In October 2002, Elder M. Russell Ballard called for the preparation of “the greatest generation of missionaries in the history of the Church.” This call for “raising the bar” has had a significant effect on gospel teachers within the Church, and especially those within the Church Educational System (CES). As a result of increased expectations of Church youth, the standards of teaching for religious educators who instruct the youth have also risen. These higher teaching standards call for increased student participation in the learning process. This heightened focus on student participation has, however, left some religious educators frustrated as they have struggled to understand how student participation is defined and how to best implement it in their classrooms. As student participation is promoted, some teachers have felt that direct instructional methods—such as lecture—have become discouraged. These religious educators have interpreted student participation to be synonymous with students’ physical and verbal involvement, and therefore inconsistent with teacher lecture. As a result, some teachers have begun to wonder both privately and publicly, “If we aren’t supposed to lecture, then why did the Savior do it so much? Did the Master Teacher use active learning in his teaching? Did he use anything like group work, peer-to-peer instruction, or experiential learning exercises? If so, how? If not, then why are we being asked to?” Seeking understanding and answers to these questions is valuable to the success of today’s CES classroom.

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Table of Contents

Journal

Religious Educator 10/3 (2009)
Jesus Christ
Education

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